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Tokyo

Sushi Sho

鮨 祥

A refined interior, exquisite antique tableware collection, visually appealing and delicious appetizers with perfectly prepared ingredients, and sumptuous nigiri shaped by a master whose unassuming personality adds to his appeal – these elements roll Sushi Sho into an unforgettable dining experience.

Sushi Sho emerged on the Tokyo food scene in July 2021 in the space vacated by famed Japanese restaurant Goryu Kubo, whose chef remains the owner. The counter is skillfully manned by Sho Mitsui. He polished his techniques at Ginza’s Harutaka over eight-and-a-half years and now has the backing of Goryu Kubo’s owner, who penned the characters for the restaurant’s sign. Gentle light falls on the sign in a quiet corner of the busy Nishi-Azabu neighborhood, leading you to a staircase down to a relaxed space with a counter for six.

Mostly unchanged from the former resident but with modifications to ensure guests can witness the chef’s masterful sushi-shaping techniques, this interior is simple and minimalist, conveying Japanese sensibilities. Freshly shaped pieces of nigiri are placed on splendid Karatsu ware by Munehiko Maruta, and appetizers are served ever so nonchalantly on incredibly expensive antique pieces. Young staff all move in an effortless style offering warm hospitality to guests.

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CUISINE

Witness the chef’s masterful sushi-shaping techniques

The chef’s course contains an astounding twenty or more dishes, including around seven appetizers maximizing the innate flavor of the premium ingredients. The abalone in the savory egg custard is from the best region each season and has an exquisite al dente texture followed by a milky flavor that makes you fall in love with this dish. It is topped with a glossy, thickened sauce rich in the flavor of clam broth. The deceptively simple-looking octopus dish is a masterpiece. The octopus from Sajima, Kanagawa, takes one hour to cook, culminating in a performance in which the chef hooks it out of the boiling pot and takes it straight to the plate, serving up exquisite texture alongside deeply satisfying aromas accented by sudachi citrus.

Diners should plan a visit in autumn to savor sanma Pacific saury – a dish showcasing the chef’s mastery of Japanese cooking techniques. He opens the fish to remove every bone painstakingly, then returns the innards for cooking. The aromas of the grilled skin and juicy flesh are jaw-droppingly good. For guests enjoying sake, the chef serves bottarga mullet roe that has been pickled in a combination of sake lees, white miso, red miso, and Shinshu miso, resulting in a succulent flavor that will leave you asking for another serving of sake.

Chef Mitsui designs his nigiri to fill the mouth before gently falling apart, with rice cooked in a hagama traditional pot and seasoned with elegant rice vinegar to highlight the seafood umami. The seafood toppings include madai sea bream from Akashi, Hyogo, rested for two to three days for a luscious, velvety texture; kasugodai young sea bream from Oarai, Ibaraki, rested and pickled in daidai orange vinegar; and akagai bloody clam from Yuriage, Miyagi, which is not well known but in fact an outstanding producer of these fleshy clams. The nikiri reduction – a soy sauce, sake, and mirin blend – brushed on some of the nigiri pieces is a slightly salty style to add interest and modulation to the meal.

INGREDIENTS
Mitsui makes a daily trip to Toyosu to visit suppliers he forged ties with during his time at Ginza Harutaka, in addition to new relationships cultivated by himself. One indispensable ingredient is fish sent by Imabari, Ehime-based fisherman Junichi Fujimoto – a man constantly sought after by distinguished chefs in Japan for their restaurants of diverse cuisines from sushi to traditional Japanese, Chinese, French, Italian, and beyond. Fujimoto delivers fish in the best possible state using shinkeijime and other proprietary techniques to lock in freshness and umami. Sea bream and managatsuo butterfish have such refined sweetness and exquisite flavor, allowing Chef Mitsui to treat guests to seafood like they have never tasted before. Other fish and shellfish arrive direct from the Goto Archipelago in Nagasaki. And the all-important maguro is supplied by renowned Toyosu dealer Yamasawa; on this day, a 137-kilogram, longline-caught bluefin tuna from Kesennuma, Miyagi Prefecture.

Mitsui uses aged Koshihikari rice from Yamagata Prefecture, whose large grains are cooked to fall apart perfectly. It is seasoned with Mitsukan Shiragiku vinegar. For that kick so many love in sushi, Mitsui prepares wasabi mostly from Gotemba and the Naka-Izu region of Shizuoka.

Sushi Sho cuisine #0
Sushi Sho cuisine #1

CHEF

Sho Mitsui

Our expectations are piqued the moment we hear the chef built his career at Harutaka and comes here with the backing of the owner of Goryu Kubo. His success is a combination of good fortune, fantastic techniques, and a personality that endears him to mentors, enhancing his strength as a chef. He humbly adheres to his teachings while putting his own filter on things.

Born in Nagano Prefecture in 1988, the chef’s first name is Sho, which means auspicious. And while before, he envied the kanji used by others named Sho, now, as an adult, he appreciates the celebratory tone of his name. A talented judoka, he fought to compete in the interscholastic championships. After graduating from Musashino Cooking College, Mitsui worked three years at a traditional Japanese restaurant within the Hilton Tokyo in Shinjuku. Having built his foundations, he found himself intrigued with the world of sushi and especially the sushi shaped by Harutaka Takahashi, owner of the renowned Ginza Harutaka. He interviewed with the restaurant the day after dining there and decided to join the team. After eight-and-a-half years of training, he developed a keen appreciation for the perfect preparation of ingredients.

A highly motivated person by nature, Mitsui sought to become an expert in sake – an absolutely indispensable part of his life – by earning a JSA Sake Diploma. As a result, the restaurant’s regular sake collection has thirty varieties, and it is no surprise that most guests leave the choice to the master.

VISION
This is just the beginning for Mitsui, with a restaurant crowned with his name. The first goal, therefore, is to perfect his own sushi. Despite being owned by Kubo of Goryu Kubo, Mitsui is free to serve his cuisine however he chooses.

TABLEWARE

Mitsui has been fortunate to inherit a curated tableware collection assembled by the owner of Goryu Kubo over thirty years. He chooses from the broad selection of very expensive pieces based on season and ingredients, the Eiraku and Kitaoji Rosanjin pieces adding an amazing accent to the food. The oldest item in the collection is a late Ming dynasty dish used to serve sushi. The glasses are equally exquisite, including 100-year-old Baccarat antiques and Edo Kiriko delicate glass masterpieces handmade by Hanasho.

Course

Dinner
Sushi Sho full omakase course
  • The price includes our booking fee of ¥8,000
  • The price includes our booking fee of ¥8,000
¥44,000
¥44,000
Reservation Request
Dinner
Sushi Sho full omakase course (More luxurious ingredients) from June
  • The price includes our booking fee of ¥8,000
  • The price includes our booking fee of ¥8,000
¥54,000
¥54,000
Reservation Request

Tokyo

Sushi Sho

鮨 祥

PRICE
¥44,000
~
CHILD
15
& UP
MIN GUESTS
1
PERSON
~
GENRE
Sushi, Nishiazabu
ADDRESS
B1F, 106-0031 Tokyo, Minato City, Nishiazabu, 2 Chome−15−1
OPEN
6PM-, 8:45PM-
CLOSED
Sunday and holidays
URL
NA
PHONE
NA

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